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VIDEO: Plans to fly a falcon and hawk around Diss in a bid to clear town of pigeon mess have moved a step closer




Jenna the Falcon, one of two birds which could be flown around Diss to deter pigeons. Picture: Chris Morris
Jenna the Falcon, one of two birds which could be flown around Diss to deter pigeons. Picture: Chris Morris

Plans to fly a falcon and a hawk around Diss to scare away pigeons in a bid to rid the town of unsightly droppings have moved a step closer.

According to Dealey Bird Control and Falconry, the company now has the go-ahead from Norfolk County Council Highways to fly the birds along Mere Street.

Diss Town Council has given its backing, with the bird control specialists expecting to hear from South Norfolk District Council in the next few days about any environmental concerns.

Once that is in place, the company will write to and visit shopkeepers asking if they would like to contribute £3 a week, which will pay for the scheme, with the number of flights, and level of deterrent dependent on how many shops contribute.

The birds are trained not to kill and will be flown one at a time.

Falconer Mark Wright said the company has already been working in the town to remove roosting pigeons by hand, including two baby pigeons, from Diss Pavilion on the grounds of health and safety.

The pavilion has now been pigeon-proofed with bird nets and the birds released.

It followed concerns from parents and the pavilion kiosk about pigeon mess in the area.

"We looked after the two babies for a while before releasing them to be cared for by their parents," said Mr Wright.

“The falcon and hawk plans have taken a while having to get the various permissions, but we are almost there and expect to be writing to, or visiting shopkeepers within the next seven to ten days.

'The initial feedback was all good."

The proposed bird control scheme is classed as non-lethal and is used nationwide, including in Trafalgar Square in London.

Dealey Bird Control is employed to fly the birds on industrial estates, colleges, hospitals, schools, football grounds and research parks across East Anglia.

This article appears in the May 17 edition of the Diss Express



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