Home   News   Article

Subscribe Now

Tributes paid to Laura Turner-Hewitt, a year on from her death to coronavirus



More news, no ads

LEARN MORE


Friends of Laura Turner-Hewitt have been remembering the fun times and memories they shared – a year on from her death.

The 31-year-old died on April 22 last year, less than two weeks after being diagnosed with Covid-19.

At the time, she was believed to be one of the youngest people in East Anglia to die from the virus.

Miss Turner-Hewitt was one of the youngest victims to coronavirus in Norfolk at the time of her death.
Miss Turner-Hewitt was one of the youngest victims to coronavirus in Norfolk at the time of her death.

Miss Turner-Hewitt, who had learning disabilities, grew up in Champney’s Road in Diss and was a member of Debenham Girls Group (DGG) – a group of young women with learning disabilities who meet on the last Thursday of every month for social activities.

Pat Brightwell, who runs DGG, paid tribute to Miss Turner-Hewitt, as the group prepares to restart meetings without her.

“It was a year ago that we lost our friend Laura,” she said.

Laura Turner-Hewitt and her mother, Rachel Turner-Hewitt.
Laura Turner-Hewitt and her mother, Rachel Turner-Hewitt.

“We have not been able to go to any Debenham Girls Group meetings for a long time and, when we return, there will be something missing.

“We will all talk about our friend, and how long we have known her – some of us were at primary school with Laura, and some have been more recent friends.

“We will also remember all the great things we have done together, like sleepovers, enjoying meals out, staying at Potters Resort for short breaks and going to pantos.”

A well-known figure around Diss, Miss Turner-Hewitt won Diss Town Council’s first Junior Good Citizen award in 2002, and volunteered at Break, a charity shop in Mere Street for vulnerable children in Diss, for more than six years.

On Easter Sunday last year, she began having pains in her chest and was taken to Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, where she was diagnosed with Covid-19 and pneumonia.

After 48 hours in hospital, her condition began to deteriorate and she was moved to intensive care, where she was put on a ventilator until her death eight days later.

At the time, her mother, Rachel, said: “She was a very special young woman. Everybody knew Laura – she had such a beautiful personality. She was so full of love, and so thoughtful.”

Miss Turner-Hewitt had been living in Bowthorpe Care Village in Norwich at the time of her death.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More