Rickinghall security firm hopes its sharp idea for African children will inspire others to donate

From left, Peter George, Mark Flatters, Kevin Cook, Teresa Bridgeman and Jordan Mills, of Malthouse Security in Rickinghall, with some of the pencils and cases sent to Africa. Photo: Keith Mindham.
From left, Peter George, Mark Flatters, Kevin Cook, Teresa Bridgeman and Jordan Mills, of Malthouse Security in Rickinghall, with some of the pencils and cases sent to Africa. Photo: Keith Mindham.

A Suffolk security firm is hoping their sharp idea will benefit school children in Africa – providing them a lifeline in their education.

Staff at Malthouse Security, based in Rickinghall, were alerted to the plight of pupils in Africa through the not-for-profit organisation School Aid – which told employees at the firm children could only use pencils because it was so hot, the ink dried up in pens.

Hopefully, our donation will also raise awareness of the difficulties facing children in the African educational system and it will inspire others in Suffolk to get behind the School Aid organisation

Peter George, owner, Malthouse Security

This has prompted the Malthouse team to distribute hundreds of pencils and cases.

Peter George, owner of Malthouse Security, said they really felt for families thousands of miles away who were in a less fortunate position and could not enjoy a basic education.

“We were told that since 1998 School Aid has sent more than one million books, donated by British schools and organisations, to eight African countries, reaching over 400,000 African children,” he said. “We hope that our modest donation of pencils and pencil cases will help to meet the diverse needs of young people.

“Hopefully, our donation will also raise awareness of the difficulties facing children in the African educational system and it will inspire others in Suffolk to get behind the School Aid organisation.

‘‘We have made a relatively simple donation to boys and girls in Africa but it could reap dividends for them as they progress through school.”

School Aid is an international recycling service, which aims to support the improvement of education in disadvantaged communities in Africa. It is currently appealing for books to send abroad.

Phil Johnson, a spokesperson for the organisation, said: “This donation of pencils and pencil cases will help us considerably with providing for underprivileged children in some of the most challenging educational environments in the world. Without a good education, escape from poverty is impossible and without the resources necessary to learn, an education can be hard to come by.”