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Long Stratton residents urge action as cars routinely abuse access-only road



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Families living along an access-only road in Long Stratton are pleading for traffic enforcement measures to stop motorists speeding down their street.

While St Michael’s Road is restricted to use by residents only, people have reported more than 100 cars using it every day to travel from the A140 to Swan Lane, sometimes at speeds of up to 40 miles per hour – double the limit on the residential street.

Complaints have ranged from general concerns about noise pollution caused by whizzing cars to more serious concerns about safety, with multiple reports of cars mounting pavement – and even front gardens – in recent years.

Steve Lansdell and Diane Mead with other frustrated residents behind them. Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography 2022.
Steve Lansdell and Diane Mead with other frustrated residents behind them. Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography 2022.

Dianne Mead, who has lived in St Michael’s Road for 41 years, said: “I can see people coming down the road, and sometimes they’re doing up to 40 miles an hour.”

“I have two grandchildren who are autistic and, unless we can grab them quickly, they may run out into the road and that’s a worry for me.”

The 77-year-old explained how her home had been damaged in the past by motorists losing control while going too fast down the road.

“Until your property is damaged, it makes you sit up and think ‘it could have been worse’,” she said. “Because somebody could have been hurt.”

Norfolk Constabulary has been known on occasion to send officers to the road, handing out fines to offending motorists, but 61-year-old Steve Lansdell insisted that this is never frequent enough to make any material impact.

“It’s a bit of a joke,” said the father-of-two, who has lived in the road for 23 years.

“We have had police involvement – they have come out every now and again, but it’s sporadic.

“They will put someone on the main road, but it doesn’t help if they are coming in the afternoon or at lunchtime, because we will still have 60-plus cars in the morning and again in the evening.

“The restriction is there for a reason and it’s being ignored.

“Residents bought these houses knowing there was a restriction in place on the road, so you have an expectation that there is not going to be any traffic.

“There’s been a cat knocked down, there’s constant noise and it’s impossible to get out of your driveway.”

Opinion varies on the best solution to the problem. Mr Lansdell has suggested an increased police presence on the street.

“The police have said they can’t afford to put officers here every hour of every day” he said.

“We don’t want that; we only want them to show themselves every now and again to enforce the law, just so people know that if they drive through they might get a ticket.

“People know they are breaking the law when they drive down here, and it’s amazing how fast word spreads.”

Mrs Mead suggested putting bollards in the road, which could be put down by emergency services needing immediate access.

“If there was two bollards in the middle of the road, it would act as a cut off,” she said.

“If they had something like that up, it would stop the speed and it would still allow for the emergency services.”

In response to the concerns, David Jacklin, highways area manager at Norfolk County Council said: “Any changes to access arrangements, such as the closure of a road, would need to have the backing of the local community, so we would suggest that people raise this initially with their local parish or town council to help gauge local support.”

Norfolk Constabulary did not respond to the Diss Express’ approach for comment.Families living along an access-only road in Long Stratton are pleading for traffic enforcement measures to stop motorists speeding down their street.

While St Michael’s Road is restricted to use by residents only, people have reported more than 100 cars using it every day to travel from the A140 to Swan Lane, sometimes at speeds of up to 40 miles per hour – double the limit on the residential street.

Complaints have ranged from general concerns about noise pollution caused by whizzing cars to more serious concerns about safety, with multiple reports of cars mounting pavement – and even front gardens – in recent years.

Dianne Mead, who has lived in St Michael’s Road for 41 years, said: “I can see people coming down the road, and sometimes they’re doing up to 40 miles an hour.”

“I have two grandchildren who are autistic and, unless we can grab them quickly, they may run out into the road and that’s a worry for me.”

The 77-year-old explained how her home had been damaged in the past by motorists losing control while going too fast down the road.

“Until your property is damaged, it makes you sit up and think ‘it could have been worse’,” she said. “Because somebody could have been hurt.”

Norfolk Constabulary has been known on occasion to send officers to the road, handing out fines to offending motorists, but 61-year-old Steve Lansdell insisted that this is never frequent enough to make any material impact.

“It’s a bit of a joke,” said the father-of-two, who has lived in the road for 23 years.

“We have had police involvement – they have come out every now and again, but it’s sporadic.

“They will put someone on the main road, but it doesn’t help if they are coming in the afternoon or at lunchtime, because we will still have 60-plus cars in the morning and again in the evening.

“The restriction is there for a reason and it’s being ignored.

“Residents bought these houses knowing there was a restriction in place on the road, so you have an expectation that there is not going to be any traffic.

“There’s been a cat knocked down, there’s constant noise and it’s impossible to get out of your driveway.”

Opinion varies on the best solution to the problem. Mr Lansdell has suggested an increased police presence on the street.

“The police have said they can’t afford to put officers here every hour of every day” he said.

“We don’t want that; we only want them to show themselves every now and again to enforce the law, just so people know that if they drive through they might get a ticket.

“People know they are breaking the law when they drive down here, and it’s amazing how fast word spreads.”

Mrs Mead suggested putting bollards in the road, which could be put down by emergency services needing immediate access.

“If there was two bollards in the middle of the road, it would act as a cut off,” she said.

“If they had something like that up, it would stop the speed and it would still allow for the emergency services.”

In response to the concerns, David Jacklin, highways area manager at Norfolk County Council said: “Any changes to access arrangements, such as the closure of a road, would need to have the backing of the local community, so we would suggest that people raise this initially with their local parish or town council to help gauge local support.”

Norfolk Constabulary did not respond to the Diss Express’ approach for comment.



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