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Norfolk on course for the sunniest spring on record according to the Met Office



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Norfolk looks to be on course for the sunniest spring in more than 90 years.

With blue skies and temperatures in the low to mid-20s set to remain for the rest of the week, it appears this year will be the best since records began way back in 1929.

According to the Met Office, we have enjoyed more than 632 hours of sunshine in the last three months - that's 34 per cent above average.

With the last day of Spring on Sunday, this could break records.
With the last day of Spring on Sunday, this could break records.

And with the season not ending until Sunday, the last day of May, it looks like the record set in 1989 will be beaten.

Just over 30 years ago, 646.5 hours of sunshine was recorded in the county, and 2020 has already surpassed the second best year which was in 1948 when we basked in 629.9 hours of sunshine.

Forecasters says it's all down to high pressure which has been a dominant weather feature for much of the spring period, leading to long spells of dry and settled weather for most of the country.

That good weather will continue for the rest of this week and over the weekend.

While the dry and bright conditions have probably been welcomed by parents with children off school during lockdown, it might not have been such good news for gardeners looking to maintain their spring blooms.

Rainfall levels are significantly down on what's normally expected for this time of year.

Since the start of March, Norfolk has only had 33per cent of the average rainfall we would normally get during the season with a mere 47mm.

But that's nowhere near as dry as it has been in the past - the driest spring was in 2011 when only 31.6mm of rain fell in the county.

While the good weather has enabled us to get out for our daily exercise, it has also led to many heading to the coast in recent days and causing concerns over rubbish and breaking social distancing guidelines.

With spring ending this weekend it looks like the summer will get off to just as bright a start, but the occasional thunderstorm can't be ruled out.

A long range forecast from the Met Office suggests the East of England will continue to enjoy more warm temperatures throughout June with any cloud and rain being confined to the north of the country.

The top five driest Mays on record (records dating back to 1862) for Norfolk:

  • 1989 when 10.9mm of rainfall was recorded
  • 1991 when 11.2mm of rainfall was recorded
  • 1947 when 11.96mm of rainfall was recorded
  • 1980 when 12mm of rainfall was recorded
  • 1960 when 12.2mm of rainfall was recorded

The top five driest springs on record (records dating back to 1862) for Norfolk:

  • 2011 when 31.6mm of rainfall was recorded
  • 1893 when 38.4mm of rainfall was recorded
  • 1974 when 47.9mm of rainfall was recorded
  • 1996 when 48mm of rainfall was recorded
  • 1929 when 58.8mm of rainfall was recorded

The top five sunniest Mays on record (records dating back to 1929) for Norfolk:

  • 1989 when 292 hours of sunshine was recorded
  • 1943 when 276.9 hours of sunshine was recorded
  • 1992 when 270.1 hours of sunshine was recorded
  • 1990 when 266.9 hours of sunshine was recorded
  • 1940 when 255.8 hours of sunshine was recorded

The top five sunniest springs on record (records dating back to 1929) for Norfolk:

  • 1990 when 646.5 hours of sunshine was recorded
  • 1948 when 629.9 hours of sunshine was recorded
  • 1943 when 590.5 hours of sunshine was recorded
  • 1982 when 579.9 hours of sunshine was recorded
  • 2003 when 578.2 hours of sunshine was recorded


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