New figures reveal South Norfolk residents recycle almost half of their waste

Left to right: Chairman of the Norfolk Waste Partnership, Cllr John Fisher and the High Sheriff of Norfolk, Mr James Bagge at Norfolks Materials Recovery Facility operated by Norse Environmental Waste Services. Picture: Norfolk Waste Partnership.
Left to right: Chairman of the Norfolk Waste Partnership, Cllr John Fisher and the High Sheriff of Norfolk, Mr James Bagge at Norfolks Materials Recovery Facility operated by Norse Environmental Waste Services. Picture: Norfolk Waste Partnership.

With the Prime Minister unveiling the Government’s 25 Year Environment Plan, the latest year end recycling figures for South Norfolk have revealed residents are getting better at recycling.

The Government’s waste and recycling figures for England for the year ending March 2017 show Norfolk’s overall recycling rate has increased.

It is really great to see the result of Norfolk’s residents recycling efforts

Cllr John Fisher

Norfolk residents now recycle 46.7 per cent or their waste, with South Norfolk residents recycling 44.9 per cent. The Government’s recycling target for 2020 is 50 per cent.

Residents in the Broadland District came out on top, recycling 50.9 per cent of waste.

Chairman of the Norfolk Waste Partnership, councillor John Fisher said: “It is really great to see the result of Norfolk’s residents recycling efforts.

“I am delighted to see the Government recognise the contribution the Eastern region as a whole makes to England’s recycling rate.”

Norfolk has one of the lowest left over rubbish figures in the Eastern region at 522.7Kgs per household. The leftover rubbish in the Eastern region is 531.3Kgs and 557.3Kgs for the whole of England.

Cllr Fisher added: “Norfolk residents are top-notch recyclers and waste-reducers.

“A big thank you to everyone for reducing, reusing and recycling their rubbish. It saves taxpayers’ money and it’s good for the environment.”

Paula Boyce, principal communications officer for Norfolk Waste Partnership, said: “With households now making recycling part of normal everyday life, Norfolk has come a long way since the early recycling levels in the 90s.

“There remains so much more residents can be recycling though – as long as recyclable materials are clean, dry and loose (not bagged) when placed in recycling bins – it won’t go to waste.”

Earlier this year, the partnership launched its ‘Give your recycling a little bit of love’ campaign.