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More Diss traders join campaign to become plastic-free town




Diss, Norfolk. Traders in Cobbs Yard have joined the plastic free status pictured from left Chloe Howard, (So Fetch), Dee Royds (Lily & Rose), Julie Debenham (Cut & Chat hair salon), Sue Norman (Diss Wool & Craft Shop) and Kirsty Howard (Gluten Free Food Store).''Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography
Diss, Norfolk. Traders in Cobbs Yard have joined the plastic free status pictured from left Chloe Howard, (So Fetch), Dee Royds (Lily & Rose), Julie Debenham (Cut & Chat hair salon), Sue Norman (Diss Wool & Craft Shop) and Kirsty Howard (Gluten Free Food Store).''Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography

Diss has moved a step closer to becoming a plastic-free town.

Five more stores, including The Gluten Free Food Store, Lily & Rose, Diss Wool & Craft Shop, the So Fetch Dress Agency and Cut & Chat hairdressers, in Cobbs Yard, have all committed to reducing plastic use.

The Heritage Triangle traders are bidding to win plastic-free status for the town and hope to encourage others.

The traders follow in the footsteps of Fredricks Fine Foods, The Natural Food Store, The Sweetie Shop and Claire’s Sugarcraft, Amandines and Skincense in Norfolk House Yard, which all pledged to commit to go plastic-free last month.

Kirsty Howard, of the Gluten Free Food Store, said: “It’s good for the environment and good for the town.

“We have recently converted to brown paper bags for purchases and started using compostable cardboard boxes and paper bags for our home-baked goods.

“We also offer 100 per cent recyclable serviettes and wooden forks for food we sell to take out, such as sausage rolls and cakes.”

Chloe Howard, who runs the So Fetch Dress Agency, said:“We never use plastic bags and wrap all of our items in tissue paper and paper bags.”

Plastic-free status is awarded by Cornwall-based campaign organisation Surfers Against Sewage.

Thirteen communities have been awarded plastic-free status so far.

Last week, more than 40 companies nationwide, including Morrisons, also signed up to a pact to cut plastic pollution over the next seven years.

Lily & Rose clothing store in Cobbs Yard offers customers paper bags, which can be reused.

“We have done this for 15 years and think going plastic free is a great opportunity for the town,” said owner Alice Humphrey.

Diss Wool & Craft Shop encourages customers to use bags for life, or reuse their carrier bags.

“We avoid the use of plastic if at all possible and encourage customers to use their own bags when making a purchase,” said owner Sue Norman.

“Our range of yarns already includes recycled fibres, including recycled denim and cotton, which includes polyester made from unwanted plastic.”

Cut & Chat hairdressers has been using paper carrier bags for some time.

“We also have biodegradable towels to cut down on the use of paper,” said owner Julie Debenham.

The march towards plastic-free status is being led by John and Juliette Atkinson of Fredricks Fine Foods.

“It is great news that more traders have joined the bid for plastic-free status,” said Juliette. “So many things are made of plastic, we can’t get rid of it entirely, but we can make a greater effort to cut down on the amount we actually use.

“We would like to encourage as many traders as possible to join us in helping to cut down pollution in our seas.”



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