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‘Mammoth’ community support praised as Roydon crosses huge hurdle to keep village whole


By Mike Scialom


Roydon residents at the meeting at Long Stratton. Submitted photo.
Roydon residents at the meeting at Long Stratton. Submitted photo.

A Norfolk village is celebrating after crossing a huge hurdle to keep their community whole.

Roydon residents spoke out after proposals to change the boundary with Diss – which would have seen 472 of its 1,098 properties move.

We are a strong group and this needless move would have ruined our cohesive and tight-knit community as Roydon village
Mark Emsden, Leave Roydon (Norfolk) Whole

Concerns were raised over the change, including how much council tax new Diss residents, and those Roydon residents not moving, would have to pay.

A typical band D homeowner in Roydon currently pays £23.09 in council tax to the village authority – but their counterparts in Diss pay £163.92.

But villagers made their voice heard, attending a meeting in Long Stratton earlier today – where the Electoral Arrangements Review Committee recommended not to implement to proposed boundary change – voting four to one.

A final decision will be made by full council at South Norfolk in February 2018.

Nikki Jayne Atkins gave a heartfelt speech at the meeting.

“Thank you to our own families and other residents who have been supportive and we hope we did you all proud,”she said. “We could not be happier with the result.”

Mark Emsden, from the Leave Roydon (Norfolk) Whole community group, formed in the wake of the proposals, said: “We are a strong group and this needless move would have ruined our cohesive and tight-knit community as Roydon village.

“We strongly opposed the boundary changes on all levels with mammoth support from the villagers who live here, and have worked hard to prove our case here.”

Peter Knights, also of the group, added: “Thanks to the team involved in backing the fight on behalf of the community – Roydon Parish Council, Roydon Church and pub who have all supported us strongly in this fight.”

By law, the district council must review boundaries every 15 years.



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