Diss Town Mayor praises Roydon residents for fighting their corner to keep community whole

Mayor of Diss Trevor Wenman. Photo: Mecha Morton.
Mayor of Diss Trevor Wenman. Photo: Mecha Morton.

Diss Town Mayor Trevor Wenman has congratulated Roydon residents for fighting their corner in the bid to keep their village whole.

The community rallied after proposals to alter the boundary between Diss and Roydon were put forward – which would have seen 472 of the village’s 1,098 properties move to Diss.

Roydon residents at the meeting at Long Stratton. Submitted photo.

Roydon residents at the meeting at Long Stratton. Submitted photo.

By law, district councils must review their boundaries every 15 years – but in Long Stratton last Wednesday, the Electoral Arrangements Review Committee recommended not to implement to proposed boundary change – voting four to one.

A final decision will be made by full council at South Norfolk in February 2018.

Speaking to Park Radio on Wednesday, Mr Wenman said: “I have to start by saying well done to the Roydon residents for fighting their corner and making such an eloquent case.

“We, as a town council, did what we had to do in the interest of Diss residents and the Roydon residents and councillors did what they had to do in their interests.

The Leave Roydon Whole group demonstrated very eloquently last week they care about that shared history. And they convinced the committee to throw out their own proposals

Diss Town Mayor Trevor Wenman

“What we were basically saying was; ‘if we were starting from scratch, this is where the border should logically go’. But we are not starting from scratch.

“The boundary between our two parishes is a product of our shared history.

“The Leave Roydon Whole group demonstrated very eloquently last week they care about that shared history. And they convinced the committee to throw out their own proposals.

“They did that because they hit on the point we all missed – which is that this should be about not just administrative efficiency, and convenience and bureaucracy – its should be about communities, it should be about community cohesion, and we risked, in their words, ‘ripping’ their community apart.

“We did not want to do that. That was not the point of it.

Mr Wenman added the boundary – while perhaps not the most efficient – added to Norfolk’s “quirky” nature.

“I have done a lot of thinking since last Wednesday – local government should be about communities, not about lines on a map.

“So the border’s untidy, inefficient, administratively inconvenient? I’d use another word – quirky.”

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