Home   News   Article

Diss Town FC director dies at 72




The director of Diss Town Football Club, Brian Major, has died at the age of 72.

Mr Major died last week – six months after being diagnosed with amyloidosis, a rare protein deposition disease.

Despite early projections suggesting he might live for years, his conditioned rapidly deteriorated over the past few months, although his daughter, Stacey Skinner, insisted he had remained resilient throughout his battle with the disease.

Brian Major was a much loved figure around Diss and its neighbouring towns.(34246462)
Brian Major was a much loved figure around Diss and its neighbouring towns.(34246462)

Mrs Skinner, 34, said: “He was such a fighter. We were blown away by his determination to try to stay with us all. The last few months, he was going to five appointments a week. He tried everything to fight it, but obviously it wasn’t meant to be.”

Mr Major was a well-known footballing figure in the Diss area, playing in goal for Wortham FC, before taking on the role as director at Diss Town Football Club later on in life.

In his younger years, Mr Major had played in goal for Wortham FC (34246466)
In his younger years, Mr Major had played in goal for Wortham FC (34246466)

In a post online, the club said: “Brian was a club stalwart for many years, assisting the club in any way he could and providing wise counsel as a director and committee member.

“He was also a shrewd observer of the game, who will be sorely missed by his friends.”

Mrs Skinner added: “He was always up for a chat, and a bubbly character – a bit of a jack-the-lad.

“He was always supportive, and always in his element with his grandchildren – he couldn’t do enough for them. They would ask grandfather for something and he would just give it to them, because that was what he was like.”

Mrs Skinner added that the current coronavirus crisis had put added strain on his final months, as hospitals restricted the number of visitors, even for non-Covid-19 patients.

She said: “It made it very difficult for us as a family to get the help we needed, because we couldn’t sit with him for appointments.

“It’s understandable, because we don’t want to endanger other people, but, as a family, it was extremely hard.”

Mr Major’s family have set up a web page to raise money for other people suffering from amyloidosis.

Mrs Skinner added: “It’s so important for us to raise as much money as we can for this research. We want to offer patients the support that my dad didn’t get.

“If you have cancer, there are specific people for that, but there isn’t for amyloidosis.”

Mr Major's family are raising money for research into amyloidosis – you can donate here.


More by this author



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More