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Diss computer store chips in by donating PCs to locked down students




A Diss computer store is chipping in by donating PCs to school students during lockdown.

1 2 1 Computers is asking residents to bring in their unwanted laptops and desktops, which will be given to students who do not have the necessary equipment for online learning – a necessity with the third lockdown now in effect.

Hardware continues to pile up at the Victoria Road business after almost 100 kind-hearted people stopped by to drop-off their old computers at the store’s donation station, since the campaign began on Monday.

Amy Steggles, pictured with some of the computers that have been donated over the past week.	Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography.
Amy Steggles, pictured with some of the computers that have been donated over the past week. Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography.

Staff are then working around the clock to wipe the computers clean and make any necessary repairs before they are sent out to schools in the area.

Amy Steggles, who works at the store and has two children of her own, came up with the idea after seeing a similar scheme running in Norwich.

She said: “We see so many laptops discarded each week that have the potential to benefit students who are currently having to home school but do not have access to the technology.

“While these machines may not be state of the art, we will bring them to a spec where they can be used for basic learning requirements.”

Store owner Mary Blackbourn said that staff had been overwhelmed by the positive response from people.

“It’s been absolutely phenomenal,” she said. “Some people have even been bringing four or five along – it has been brilliant.”

The first batch of computers will be given directly to schools in the area today.

Despite taking donations, the store ceased trading as normal this month as part of the latest Government lockdown.

As children are forced to study from home as part of the latest lockdown measures, reports suggest that many are falling behind.

Last year, it was estimated that 700,000 children in the UK were not doing home work and did not have proper access to the tools they needed to learn.



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