Home   News   Article

Subscribe Now

Deal Farm fails to rule out possibility of another planning application



More news, no ads

LEARN MORE


A developer behind a controversial anaerobic digester plant has promised there are “no plans” to increase feedstock volumes at the controversial plant – but failed to rule out the possibility entirely.

Last month, developer Storengy announced it would be reducing the amount of feedstock travelling to Deal Farm in Bressingham, withdrawing its initial planning application and replacing it with a revised one.

The new application, it promised, would drastically reduce the number of vehicles travelling to and from the plant – a main sticking point for villagers concerned about the road network’s ability to accommodate the plans.

Residents have raised suspicions that the developers will simply apply for more planning permission to increase the feedstock volume in the future. Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography 2022.
Residents have raised suspicions that the developers will simply apply for more planning permission to increase the feedstock volume in the future. Picture: Mark Bullimore Photography 2022.

When asked by the Diss Express if it could offer campaigners a cast-iron guarantee that, provided the latest application is approved, the firm would not submit a further application looking to increase feedstock volumes, a spokesman could only say there were “no plans” to do so.

They said: “Subject to obtaining planning permission, our focus will be on completing the construction and commissioning of the plant, with a view to getting the plant operational as soon as possible and thus able to begin delivering the many benefits of the project.

“We can guarantee to the local community that there are no plans to submit a future application to increase the feedstock volume, and Deal Farm Biogas has said it is happy to be conditioned on the level of feedstock processed, should the planning approval be granted.”

The statement is unlikely to reassure campaigners, who claim that the new plans, with the proposed levels of digestate now halved, have left the plant financially unviable.

At a village hall meeting earlier this month, Sue Butler, who lives on nearby Villa Farm, said: “They’ve built a plant the size it is ... now they’re saying they’re going to put half the amount of feedstock in to it, but they’ve still got the same capacity, if not more.”

Anaerobic digestion is the process by which organic matter, such as animal or food waste, is broken down to produce biogas, which can be used to generate renewable energy.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More