Council tax to remain the same for Diss residents

VILLAGE SIGN - DISS TOWN SIGN ENGANL00120140601120721
VILLAGE SIGN - DISS TOWN SIGN ENGANL00120140601120721
Share this article

After lengthy debate, Diss residents will not have to pay any extra council tax to their town council for the 2016/17 financial year.

Diss town councillors agreed at an extraordinary meeting on Wednesday to impose a zero per cent rise on their portion of the council tax bill to residents. This means a Band ‘D’ homeowner will pay £149.90 a year to the town council, equivalent to about £2.88 a week.

Graham Minshull

Graham Minshull

A zero percent increase was recommended by the policy and finance committee, but at a full council meeting in January, a 2.5 per cent rise was agreed, councillors voting in favour seven votes to four, increasing the tax bill of a Band ‘D’ Diss resident by £3.75 for the year. However, there was an accounting error at the time of the decision, with the budget reconsidered on Wednesday.

During the debate councillor Graham Minshull, chairman of the policy and finance committee, said despite of the loss of a grant from South Norfolk Council, £8,000 from new homes in the town, as well as rent from Park Radio, which is set to operate from Diss Youth and Community Centre, would help cover that loss.

“Over the last few years we have always put it up by inflation. The people of Diss have accepted that and we have never had a single complaint,” he told the meeting. “I believe it is wrong in a year with zero inflation, which it was in September and is the date nationally recognised for selecting that, we go and put a two-and-a-half percent in when we don’t need to.”

Councillor Chris Liggett said: “Ideally nobody wants to increase council tax. We would all love to produce excellent services and continuing improvements without asking residents for any more money but sometimes the reality is different and is sometimes hard.”

I believe it is wrong in a year with zero inflation, which it was in September and is the date nationally recognised for selecting that, we go and put a two-and-a-half percent in when we don’t need to

Graham Minshull