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Banham Zoo welcomes Rowan the Linne’s Two-Toed Sloth and Aurora the snow leopard





Keepers have welcomed a pair of new animals to Banham Zoo in the hope of helping an international breeding programme.

A female two-toed sloth called Rowan arrived at the popular attraction from Fota Wildlife Park in Ireland.

The two-years-old has joined the site’s resident male sloth, Arlo, inside the attraction’s tropical house.

Rowan the Linne’s Two-Toed Sloth. Pictures Banham Zoo
Rowan the Linne’s Two-Toed Sloth. Pictures Banham Zoo
Rowan is now enjoying life in the zoo' tropical house. Pictures Banham Zoo
Rowan is now enjoying life in the zoo' tropical house. Pictures Banham Zoo

Graeme Williamson, head of living collections at the zoo, said: “Animal transfers may not be simple, but when they are successful, it is so rewarding to know we are positively contributing to these vital breeding programmes throughout Europe and worldwide.”

Meanwhile, the zoo has also brought in a female Snow Leopard called Aurora from Thrigby Hall Wildlife Gardens.

Aurora, who is also two-years-old, has joined male Snow Leopard Shen at the zoo.

Aurora came from Thrigby Hall Wildlife Gardens. Picture: Banham Zoo
Aurora came from Thrigby Hall Wildlife Gardens. Picture: Banham Zoo
Keepers at Banham Zoo hope Aurora will bond with their resident male, Shen. Picture: Banham Zoo
Keepers at Banham Zoo hope Aurora will bond with their resident male, Shen. Picture: Banham Zoo

Graeme said their partnership will be crucial for the breeding of snow leopards at the site.

He added: “We are thrilled by Aurora’s arrival and are proud to do our part in protecting this endangered species, contributing to European conservation efforts right here in Norfolk.

“Every visitor who comes to see Aurora will be part of this global conservation effort, and we hope to inspire future generations to take action in protecting our planet’s precious wildlife.”

The pair are now part of the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) Endangered Species Programme.



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