Attleborough to hold public referendum on Neighbourhood Plan shaping town until 2036

General View of Attleborough



PICTURE: Mecha Morton
General View of Attleborough PICTURE: Mecha Morton

Residents have been called upon to voice their opinion on a new neighbourhood plan set to change the face of a south Norfolk town.

The Attleborough neighbourhood plan (ANP) aims to make the town into a “successful example of community-planned growth”, concluding development in 2036.

The neighbourhood plan sets out the future for Attleborough and how it will accommodate the growth for the town.

Residents are asked to be held on Thursday, November 23. After the referendum, the plan with be up for examination in January and is due to be adopted in April.

Neighbourhood plans aim to give local people more say and influence about what goes on in their area.

The plan comes ahead of an extra 4,000 planned homes in the town, which 11,675 people currently call their home.

The ANP has been produced to cover the period from 2016 to 2036 – the same time period being used for Breckland Council’s local plan.

The ANP sets out its core objective as aiming to:

l Create strong links and connection to the town’s hinterland and beyond.

l Preserve and enhance the heritage assets of Attleborough.

l Identify new employment land to be developed and encourage new small and medium size businesses to the town.

l Reduce the employability skills gap; integrate new housing with facilities in the town with the necessary footpath, cycle ways and address traffic congestion and sustainable connections to the rest of the region.

l Integrate new housing to meet the needs of all; providing excellent health and community facilities.

l Provide new and improved sport and leisure facilities.

l Promote high building standards with energy saving techniques.

l Protect and enhance the natural environments, including additional open spaces; promotion of the town to attract visitors, investors, and developers.

The plan states the core objectives came through the work of the ANP steering group and theme groups and have been extensively debated in consultation over three years and are endorsed by the community.

Writing in a foreword to the plan, Tony Perkins, chairman of the neighbourhood plan steering group, said: “Attleborough’s plan is a comprehensive document, and it looks to support and strengthen business, education, health and wellbeing, as well as catering for sport and leisure whilst encouraging good housing, easy movement in and around the town and being generally a nice place to live in.”

The use of neighbourhood plans has gained support from Richard Bacon, Member of Parliament for South Norfolk.

Writing in the Diss Express in relation to Dickleburgh’s and Rushall’s neighbourhood plans, he said: “Neighbourhood plans are not perfect, but they do give residents more say over how their community should grow, rather than having such decisions foisted on them by district and county councils.”

To view documents relating to the neighbourhood plan referendum, go to www.breckland.gov.uk/article/4284/Neighbourhood-Plans.