Waveney Foodbank’s drive keeps Christmas alive for families in need

Waveney Foodbank is working to deliver 250 boxes of food and gifts

Pictured: Jim Waters, Janice Mortlock, Gary White and David Dawson ANL-161221-142034009
Waveney Foodbank is working to deliver 250 boxes of food and gifts Pictured: Jim Waters, Janice Mortlock, Gary White and David Dawson ANL-161221-142034009
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The Waveney Foodbank hailed the ‘wonderful generosity’ of the people of south Norfolk and north Suffolk this week, as it prepares to deliver hundreds of food and gift boxes to help low-income people enjoy this Christmas.

The charity, based at the industrial estate in Brome, has ramped up its operations this month to produce Christmas parcels for struggling individuals and families, including around 150 for the Diss area, following several weeks of food collections.

The scheme, which has been added on top of the foodbank’s usual work of providing 1.5 tonnes of food a month, was created with the help of the Diss Salvation Army and care professionals, in order to identify those on tight budgets who face further pressures over the winter.

Graham Reardon, Waveney Foodbank co-ordinator, praised the public for their support, including shoppers who donated to their Tesco collection, and stated their efforts were all made worth it “by the smiles on people’s faces”.

He told the Diss Express: “Words fail me to say how wonderful the public are. We couldn’t work if not for the generosity of the general public, who are very eager to give food for people in need.

“There is greater demand in the winter. These are people who are recommended to us who are in need of an extra box for Christmas. Otherwise, they don’t have much of a Christmas at all.”

In recent months, the Waveney Foodbank has also received donations of food via community-run initiatives, from the likes of Diss Rotary Club and All Saints Primary School in Winfarthing.

Mr Reardon said he was hopeful of a good outlook for the future, but added that due to economic uncertainty, he could not predict how demand for the foodbank may change in the next few years.

“Everybody knows the economic situation is difficult,” he said.

“The largest single category of people we help is people who are working but don’t earn enough. What we are doing is probably going to go on for some time.”

The organisation is now seeking funds for a new delivery van, to replace its current 14-year-old vehicle.

To learn more about the foodbank, go to https://waveney.foodbank.org.uk