Wacton graduate tells of new found determination after conquering Kilimanjaro

Bethany Clark, of Wacton, scaled Kilimanjaro in the summer while at Brunel University. ANL-150929-155236001
Bethany Clark, of Wacton, scaled Kilimanjaro in the summer while at Brunel University. ANL-150929-155236001
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A graduate who scaled Kilimanjaro in the summer has told of her new found determination after completing the gruelling challenge in aid of Childreach International.

Bethany Clark, of Wacton, was one of 24 from Brunel University who scaled the world’s highest free-standing mountain in four days.

Bethany Clark, of Wacton, scaled Kilimanjaro in the summer while at Brunel University. ANL-150929-155248001

Bethany Clark, of Wacton, scaled Kilimanjaro in the summer while at Brunel University. ANL-150929-155248001

The group raised more than £63,000 for Childreach, which aims to offer opportunity to children across the world to unlock their potential.

Miss Clark, who graduated with a degree in journalism and is due to start an apprenticeship with South Norfolk Council, said the sight at the top of Kilimanjaro was “absolutely beautiful”, reaching the summit just as the sun was rising.

“From about day two you are above the clouds, so it is beautiful. It was amazing.

“It was relief for me when I reached the top because I did not think I would make it.”

Bethany Clark, of Wacton, scaled Kilimanjaro in the summer while at Brunel University. ANL-150929-155258001

Bethany Clark, of Wacton, scaled Kilimanjaro in the summer while at Brunel University. ANL-150929-155258001

“I know it’s a bit of a cliché but it really was different every day.

“The first day, the surroundings were very rain-foresty. It was really hot, and you could see the mist around you while you were walking through the jungle.

“The terrain got very rocky, it was like that for the last three days.

“It was very hot every day, especially walking six to eight hours. It was quite a challenge on my body.

Having fallen behind from the rest of her group by about an hour, porters advised her not to attempt to scale to the top after reaching Stellar Point, about 45 minutes from the summit.

“I said ‘no, I am going to the top. I have come all this way, I don’t care, I am going’.

“It is just so hard. It is the hardest thing I have ever done. I would not do it again, a lot of preparation goes into it!”

Miss Clark added she could take much from her African experience into her own life.

“I have just got this new found determination which I did not think I had,” she said.

“ It is something I have been putting in my job applications over the past few weeks.

“It is something I did not think I would do.”