Thelnetham Windmill open day is a success

Thelnetham mill open day  Pictured: Mark Barnard (Member of the mill management committee), Giles Smith (Chairman of the building) and Piers Hart (Chairman of Suffolk buildings preservation trust) ANL-161209-093357009
Thelnetham mill open day Pictured: Mark Barnard (Member of the mill management committee), Giles Smith (Chairman of the building) and Piers Hart (Chairman of Suffolk buildings preservation trust) ANL-161209-093357009

Thelnetham Windmill opened its doors and gave the public the chance to view inside the historic building at an open event last weekend.

Coinciding with Heritage Open Weekend, the mill, which dates back to 1819, is only one of four preserved tower mills in Suffolk.

Thelnetham mill open day  Pictured: Mark Barnard (Member of the mill management committee), Piers Hart (Chairman of Suffolk buildings preservation trust) and Giles Smith (Chairman of the building) ANL-161209-093411009

Thelnetham mill open day Pictured: Mark Barnard (Member of the mill management committee), Piers Hart (Chairman of Suffolk buildings preservation trust) and Giles Smith (Chairman of the building) ANL-161209-093411009

Bob Paterson, from the East Anglian Mills Society, was very pleased with how the day went and that the public got a rare insight into Suffolk mills.

He said: “It is incredibly important for the public to get a chance to see inside these buildings. It helps them understand how the mill works because they don’t get to see them working very often,

“They get turned into houses these days and when we have open days during the year I feel it is crucial that people get a chance to see these beautiful mills.”

The mill was fully operational in the 19th Century, but it become effectively derelict by 1926.

They get turned into houses these days and when we have open days during the year I feel it is crucial that people get a chance to see these beautiful mills

Bob Paterson, East Anglian Mills Society

It was then purchased for restoration by mill enthusiasts, or molinologists as they are known, in 1979 and managed to complete repairs by 1987.

Mr Paterson pointed out that even though the maintenance of these mills is expensive and continually ongoing, last weekend does assist the cause in other ways.

He said: “Events like this don’t generate money for the mills, but it does raise awareness in that these mills are still here after so long.

“It helps to increase the interest of these old buildings and will help all of our mills in the future and that means everything to them.”

The Heritage Open Days weekend also saw an ongoing project, which had over 100 visitors, receive a cheque to help continue plans for restoration.