Pair’s first foray into pub trade sees Fox and Hounds at Great Moulton reopen

Great Moulton Fox and Hounds reopening ''Pictured: Jayne and Phillip Ramsay along with manager Katie Archer ANL-151216-192657009
Great Moulton Fox and Hounds reopening ''Pictured: Jayne and Phillip Ramsay along with manager Katie Archer ANL-151216-192657009

The Fox and Hounds in Great Moulton has reopened after closing last year thanks to a pair’s first foray into the pub trade.

Phillip Ramsay, managing director of Diss-based Chapel Doors and Terry Devlin, of Devlin Plummer Stained Glass in Great Moulton, have taken on the pub, which will be managed by Katie Archer, who previously worked at the Tibenham Greyhound.

It’s about covering both bases — a place for the youngsters to a certain degree, as well as the people who just want to come down to their local for a pint of beer and a chat

Phillip Ramsay

The pub, which scooped the title of South Norfolk Council Community Pub of the Year in 2012, was subject to a planning application to change the pub to a residential property. But the proposal was rejected by planners at the end of August. Marilyn Forder, who owned the pub, died in July before the final decision was made.

Mr Ramsay and Mr Devlin, who have known each other for about eight years, used to drink in the pub together, and first met through the work of the Round Table.

The new owners only got the keys to the premises earlier this month, and had their reopening on Tuesday, featuring a buffet with their new chef — with Mr Ramsay describing the day as a success.

“It went very well,” he said. “There were quite a few people from the village which is what we want. The general comment is that it is nice to have it back.”

Moving forward, the pub will be open seven days a week and offer food after Christmas, as well as ales, and hopes to use the pub grounds to host beer and music festivals.

Mr Ramsay explained he had never previously harboured any desire to run a pub — but said the “unique circumstances” prompted him to get involved and return a public house to the village.

“It has never been anything I really, under normal circumstances, would have gone out there and done.

“The pub went through a number of changes, different people have been in here, and it shut, and the village had always gone on and said ‘we would like the pub back’.

“Probably about three months ago we thought ‘hey, we will go for it’ and we bought the pub.”

Mr Ramsay added he thought the support from the village was there to make it a viable business once again, and said he hopes it could become the “hub of the community.”

“It’s about covering both bases — a place for the youngsters to a certain degree, as well as the people who just want to come down to their local for a pint of beer and a chat,” he added.