Norfolk County Council sites in Brockdish and Attleborough may go under the hammer

Stock images of the now closed Brockdish Primary School.
Stock images of the now closed Brockdish Primary School.

Two sites owned by Norfolk County Council – one in Attleborough and another in Brockdish – are set to be sold.

The decision was made at a meeting of the business and property committee, which met at County Hall in Norwich on Friday.

Twenty sites in total across Norfolk are being considered for sale by the county council to generate funds.

Land adjacent to the new primary school, in London Road, Attleborough, is one of the sites up for auction.

The 3.8-hectare site was acquired by the council’s children’s services department from residential developer, Taylor Wimpey, to develop a new school.

Three hectares will be used to develop a new 630-place nursery and primary school.

Options were examined to exploit the surplus 0.8 hectares and an outline planning permission for 16 homes has been obtained, which is to include 40 per cent affordable housing.

The element of affordable housing could be used to offset the council’s supported living needs.

Direct development on the site by the council via its newly-created property development company was also considered.

However, further work is required to ascertain the value and viability of the development. It was proposed that this asset is declared surplus to council requirements.

The committee will be asked to formally declare the land at London Road, Attleborough, surplus to county council requirements and instruct the head of property to bring forward appropriate proposals for disposal or development at a future committee meeting.

A former school playing field in Grove Road, Brockdish, will also be considered for development.

The Brockdish Church of England Primary School closed in 2016, with the school buildings currently owned by the Norwich Diocese.

The playing field is owned by the county council and is 0.77 acres in size.

The playing field is essentially land-locked and access is over adjoining land in separate ownership.

The site was declared surplus to requirements in August last year. Following a review, the site is not required for use by other council services.

Due to its “landlocked” nature, there is limits to the sites use and the market value is estimated to be around £10,000. An auction has been recommended for the site.