New evidence of Tasburgh’s heritage unearthed in community archaeological digs

Test pits are being dug in the gardens of Tasburgh residents, as part of the ongoing Imagined Lands archaeological project looking at the village's history.
Test pits are being dug in the gardens of Tasburgh residents, as part of the ongoing Imagined Lands archaeological project looking at the village's history.
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A series of archaeological digs in Tasburgh over the bank holiday weekend has unearthed new evidence of occupation centuries ago.

Five more gardens belonging to residents were volunteered to have test pits dug in them for the Imagined Land project, which is trying to find out more about the historic roots of the village, particularly Tasburgh Earthworks.

Test pits are being dug in the gardens of Tasburgh residents, as part of the ongoing Imagined Lands archaeological project looking at the village's history.

Test pits are being dug in the gardens of Tasburgh residents, as part of the ongoing Imagined Lands archaeological project looking at the village's history.

Following earlier test pit digs at the end of April, when Georgian coins and a Second World War bullet were among the finds, this latest set of excavations revealed medieval pottery and animal bones, while one trench contained a Victorian-era driveway.

Lead archaeologist Giles Emery, from Norvic Archaeology, said: “We have had a variety of results. Normally, you can quite happily do test pit after test pit and not have a result, but we have had a pretty high success rate in Tasburgh.

“Lots of people are very enthusiastic about learning more about the finds. It’s built up a lot of momentum.”

All of the finds from each test pit will now be processed, washed, cleaned and analysed, ahead of a public open event at Tasburgh Village Hall on June 10, which will shed further light on the significance of each artifact.

Test pits are being dug in the gardens of Tasburgh residents, as part of the ongoing Imagined Lands archaeological project looking at the village's history.

Test pits are being dug in the gardens of Tasburgh residents, as part of the ongoing Imagined Lands archaeological project looking at the village's history.

The findings will also be shown off in a travelling exhibition, visiting local sites and Long Stratton Library.

The project, led by the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and funded with part of a £74,700 Heritage Lottery Fund grant, will also involve community activities, including creative writing and music exercises by pupils of Preston Primary School, based on the village’s history.

Mr Emery added: “Hopefully, people will be inspired by the finds.

“In terms of support and enthusiasm, it’s really brought people together. That’s been one of the aims of the project – to raise the profile of the village’s heritage.”

Test pits are being dug in the gardens of Tasburgh residents, as part of the ongoing Imagined Lands archaeological project looking at the village's history. Giles Emery, lead archaeologist, with some bones and pottery finds.

Test pits are being dug in the gardens of Tasburgh residents, as part of the ongoing Imagined Lands archaeological project looking at the village's history. Giles Emery, lead archaeologist, with some bones and pottery finds.

Go to www.norfarchtrust.org.uk/tasburgh for further details about the project.