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Waveney archaeology group gets Heritage Lottery Funding for war memorial project

Redenhall, Norfolk. Members of the Waveney Valley Community Archaeology Group, who have been given a grant from the Hertiage Lottery Fund to record and uncover hidden First World War memorials. Pictured are Lorna Richardson and Andrew Macdonald at the Joseph Phillips memorial site just outside Harleston ANL-140416-123613001

Redenhall, Norfolk. Members of the Waveney Valley Community Archaeology Group, who have been given a grant from the Hertiage Lottery Fund to record and uncover hidden First World War memorials. Pictured are Lorna Richardson and Andrew Macdonald at the Joseph Phillips memorial site just outside Harleston ANL-140416-123613001

A project aiming to uncover hidden memorials from the First World War across the Waveney Valley is set to go ahead after support from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

The Waveney Valley Community Archaeology Group will commemorate 100 years since the start of the conflict by working with local communities to find, protect, and record forgotten traces of the war.

The four-year project will also provide support for Waveney Valley Community Archaeology Group members to work with local communities to record and survey the informal war memorials found in parishes in the valley.

It will contribute to a digital archive of material being created, permanently available to local communities, authorities and the wider public. The volunteer-run group say it could be used to “inform future decision making in planning and heritage monitoring.”

Every parish that touches the River Waveney will be involved.

Lorna Richardson, project co-ordinator and an archaeologist from University College London said: “We are delighted to receive support from the Heritage Lottery Fund for this exciting and important project. After the First World War a massive programme of memorial building took place across the whole of England.

“Every parish in the country has stone monuments and graveyard memorials inscribed with the names of the fallen, and today it is these memorials that remain the focus for all annual commemorations.

“But alongside these formal monuments were many hundreds of more discrete and personal memorials to losses suffered by our communities.

“It is these we want to bring to wider attention.”

Andrew Macdonald, also co-ordinating the project, added: “There will be an online archive, digital resources, local travelling exhibitions and guided trails of the more significant discoveries, allowing people to learn about and understand the wider impact of the First World War in a local context.”

For more information on the group, visit www.waveneyarchaelogy.org

 

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