DCSIMG

Part of aircraft auctioned in the US - as a pen

Thorpe Abbotts, Norfolk. Ron Batley, curator at the 100th Bomb Group Memorial Museum with part of the tail fin of a B-17 which was stationed at THorpe Abbotts during WWII which part of it has been made into a pen and sold in the USA

Thorpe Abbotts, Norfolk. Ron Batley, curator at the 100th Bomb Group Memorial Museum with part of the tail fin of a B-17 which was stationed at THorpe Abbotts during WWII which part of it has been made into a pen and sold in the USA

A pen made from a damaged piece of aluminium from the tail of a bomber has been auctioned off in the United States- almost 70 years to the day that the aircraft was shot down.

Paul Turner, of Tattlepot Road, Pulham Market, makes pens as a hobby.

After a piece of aluminium taken from an aircraft before it flew and was subsequently shot down in Germany was donated to the 100th Bomb Group Memorial Museum in Thorpe Abbotts, Mr Turner was charged with making a pen from the material.

After the pen was made, along with presentation box and scroll, it was taken to the to a bomb group reunion in Savannah, Georgia, and auctioned off - making $350 for the upkeep of the 100th Bomb Group museum based at Thorpe Abbotts.

Following the auction, the pen was donated to Michael Faley, a photo archivist for the 100th Bomb Group Foundation, who lives in Los Angleles, California.

The pen was sent to America in October -almost 70 years to the day the craft - called Forever Yours- was shot down over Germany in October of 1943.

“It was such an emotional thing to do,” he said. “The more that I found out about the aircraft and crew I thought if I could make something nice of it I will donate it to them.It got more personal as time went on. They were chuffed to bits,”

The metal, which was part of a bench made from ammo cases, was given to the group by a farmer from Brockdish in May 2003. Identification numbers on the metal, however, revealed it was actually from a bomber. The tail fin had sustained gunfire -meaning the aluminium had to be replaced as it was too damaged to be part of the craft.

Ronald Batley, curator at the 100th Bomb Group museum said: “We were lost for words. All of us were just astounded by what we had seen and he had created. It was something very, very special.

Mr Turner, who began work on the pen in late August of this year, says he doubts he will do a similar project again.

“I have plans to do a few little bits and bobs for them, but I won’t do anything like this again because it was so unique and it was not an easy thing to do. It was so special to me that I don’t think I could replicate that.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page