Family tragedy and depression inspires Framlingham mum’s London Marathon run

Framingham, Suffolk. Kelly Goody, a freelance personal trainer from Framlingham, is running the London Marathon for Meningitis Research Foundation, inspired by her younger brother Martyn, who died from the disease when they were only children. 

Picture: MARK BULLIMORE PHOTOGRAPHY
Framingham, Suffolk. Kelly Goody, a freelance personal trainer from Framlingham, is running the London Marathon for Meningitis Research Foundation, inspired by her younger brother Martyn, who died from the disease when they were only children. Picture: MARK BULLIMORE PHOTOGRAPHY

A Framlingham trainer running the London Marathon for the first time this weekend says she hopes to help the battle against meningitis, and put personal ‘demons’ to rest.

Kelly Goody, 39, a mother-of-two who lives in Pembroke Road, is taking on the challenge on Sunday in aid of the Meningitis Research Foundation (MRF) — a cause she was inspired to support after her younger brother Martyn passed away from the disease, when he was just 15 months old.

Mrs Goody, who works as a freelance personal trainer, explained that her brother’s death affected her greatly when she became a mother, particularly when she started suffering postnatal depression when her second son was born.

“One of my anxieties was getting my two boys passed the age my brother was when he died,” she said.

“I was constantly on guard for meningitis. To the point where I would spend the night awake in their bedrooms monitoring them.”

Mrs Goody said her eldest son, Thomas, was prone to having febrile convulsions if his temperature got too high, describing one instance where he had a convulsion while her parents were around the house.

She recalled her father ran with her son in his arms to the doctor down the road, and had been very upset by the incident.

“Mum explained that it was because my brother had a convulsion when he was very ill with meningitis,” she said.

“It goes to show that years after meningitis strikes a family, you can still be affected by it, physically or emotionally.

“Now I am mentally stronger, I am finally doing my bit to help fight against meningitis and also put some postnatal depression ‘demons’ to bed myself about the effects this disease had on our family.”

Mrs Goody added that tackling the London Marathon was “a big step”, having previously only run half-marathons, but by being outside her comfort zone, it had given her the push she needed for her training.

To date, she has collected £1,400 towards her £1,750 goal, through public fundraising events and online donations.

Vinny Smith, Chief Executive of MRF, said: “We are really grateful to Kelly for taking on this huge challenge to help raise funds for MRF.

“The money raised will fund vital scientific research into the prevention, detection and treatment of meningitis, raise awareness of the disease and support those affected.”

To support her cause, please go to www.justgiving.com/fundraising/kelly-goody