Eyes on the road: Volunteer groups detect 180 speeding offences in south Norfolk

Community Speed Watch groups in south Norfolk captured over 180 speeding offences in October 2017. Picture: South Norfolk Police.
Community Speed Watch groups in south Norfolk captured over 180 speeding offences in October 2017. Picture: South Norfolk Police.

It’s not just the police who are keeping an eye on south Norfolk’s roads, as Community Speed Watch volunteers have detected an impressive amount of offences committed by drivers.

Volunteers in the Diss Express area spotted 180 speed offences committed by motorists last month.

All information obtained by volunteers is shared with police and helps us inform our patrol routes so we can provide additional support if serious speeding concerns are identified

Chief Inspector for South Norfolk Police, Alice Scott

Chief Inspector for South Norfolk Police, Alice Scott, said: “Speeding is often a key concern in many communities across Norfolk and Community Speed Watch gives local residents the power and opportunity to do something positive about it.

“Many of those taking part in schemes across the county report that volunteers are having a significant effect, with their presence ensuring motorists consider the speed they are travelling at.”

Community Speed Watch was launched in 2007 and is a project working across Norfolk – allowing communities to play an active part alongside the Police and the Safety Camera Partnership in tackling the problem of speeding.

Teams with a minimum of six volunteers, with verbal support form their parish council, have been trained to use speed guns across the County.

The groups are issued with equipment and carry out speed checks in 30 and 40mph limits working to official guidelines.

Speeding offences are logged – including details such as vehicle registration mark, make, model or colour – and sent into the Safety Camera Partnership team within 48 hours, who then take further action.

Norfolk currently has 70 teams with new teams awaiting training. Each district has a designated Engagement Officer providing support and assistance to members.

Chief Inspector Scott added: “In addition, all information obtained by volunteers is shared with police and helps us inform our patrol routes so we can provide additional support if serious speeding concerns are identified. We would actively encourage those communities that do not currently have Community Speed Watch to step forward and volunteer if they wish.”

For more information or to set up a Community Speed Watch scheme in your village or town, call the Norfolk Safety Camera Partnership on 01603 276433 or the local district Engagement Officer by dialling 101.

Alternatively, you can download the Community Speed Watch booklet from www.norfolk.police.uk/join-us/volunteers/community-speed-watch.