Diss and Roydon housing applications rejected as ‘unsustainable’

Diss, Norfolk. Land near the Catholic Church on Shelfanger road which is planned to be turned into housing ANL-141211-164132001

Diss, Norfolk. Land near the Catholic Church on Shelfanger road which is planned to be turned into housing ANL-141211-164132001

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A pair of proposals that could have brought about the development of 68 properties in Diss and Roydon will not see the light of day after South Norfolk Council refused both plans this month.

The applications, which each sought permission to build on land south of the B1077 Shelfanger Road, which extends into Diss and Roydon, were both rejected via a delegated decision without going to a planning committee, on the grounds that the site is not within the existing development boundary and does not have appropriate safety measures for accessing it.

In the decision documentation for both applications, case officer Helen Bowman concluded: “The scheme would present a level of harm in terms of intrusion into the countryside and poor quality design, and weighted against the modest economic benefits does not represent sustainable development.”

The first proposal, submitted by a Mr C Moore, outlined a 35 house development, consisting of 25 market homes and ten dwellings defined as ‘affordable units’, while the second, put forward by a Mr R Haydon, was for a residential development, believed to be in the region of 33 new properties, as well as a children’s play area and open space.

David Goldson, South Norfolk Council chairman and district and parish councillor for Roydon, said this decision was to be expected and indicated developers would, for the most part, find it very difficult to gain planning permission on any sites not allocated for development in the area’s Local Plan.

“I’m not surprised they were rejected,” he said.

“My feeling was that the density was too high, particularly in relation to the problems with access, so I am not surprised at all.”

Cllr Goldson added: “Within the Local Plan, there are set specific allocations for these developments. In the sort of areas we are talking about, the developments are very small and there aren’t any major infrastructure problems.

“There is always going to be pressure on things like doctor’s surgeries. For every new house, there’s the potential for new people to join the practice.

“But there will be small developments which fit the bill quite nicely, and they may be approved.”