British and American military veterans and active service members join forces for Thorpe Abbotts dig

UNEARTHED: It is hoped the digs will build camaraderie among past and present service members. Pictures: USAF/Alexandria Lee
UNEARTHED: It is hoped the digs will build camaraderie among past and present service members. Pictures: USAF/Alexandria Lee

British and American military veterans along with active service members joined forces for an archaeological dig at the former RAF Thorpe Abbotts, earlier this month.

The American Veterans Archaeology Recovery Programme is the creation of Stephen Humphreys, a veteran US Air Force aircraft maintenance officer.

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. John Melendez, 727th Air Mobility Squadron program manager for standardization and modernization, holds a grate from a wood-burning stove found at an archeological dig site near Diss, England, Sept. 6, 2017. Organized by the American Veterans Archeology Recovery Program, the dig was held at the site occupied by the former 100th Bombardment Group during World War II. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Lee)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. John Melendez, 727th Air Mobility Squadron program manager for standardization and modernization, holds a grate from a wood-burning stove found at an archeological dig site near Diss, England, Sept. 6, 2017. Organized by the American Veterans Archeology Recovery Program, the dig was held at the site occupied by the former 100th Bombardment Group during World War II. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Lee)

It aims to build camaraderie among past and present service members through the teaching of archeological skills.

The site for the dig was the former 100th Bombardment Group base at Thorpe Abbotts.

Although most of the facilities have been demolished and the land returned to the original owners, there are still some intact structures.

A few have been restored to form the 100th Bomb Group Memorial Museum, which sponsored the dig.

The group of seven, which also included a representative from the University of East Anglia, unearthed a grate from a wood-burning stove and a piece of window from a B-17 Flying Fortress.

A pair of dog tags were also recovered. The group now plans to return the tags to the original owners or their descendants with the help of the 100th Bomb Group.